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Over Vaccination Side Effect That Many Pet Owners Never Suspect

Over Vaccination Side Effect That Many Pet Owners Never Suspect

Article Preface

  Working in the Veterinary Industry in the late 1970's and early 1980's I witnessed in what is my opinion an over enthusiasm for vaccinating dogs and cats. Over the following almost 4 decades this has grown from an over enthusiastic approach by the Veterinary Industry to a cult like obsession. I watched dogs and cats contract illnesses and conditions that did not make sense; not being a Veterinarian myself my thinking and loyalty was not bound to a set of prescribed notions of what was happening. The link (while anecdotal) was pretty clear to me; the amount and frequencies of vaccines being given must have a "cause and effect" association.

Although my background and experience told me I shouldn't,  I still followed my Veterinarians advice when it came to puppy series, primary core vaccines and yearly boosters. I watched my own medium size working dogs, tiny and large breed dogs of others getting the same exact dosages of vaccines including the rabies vaccine.  I watched puppies being given their full puppy series at 5 to 7 weeks old and witnessed the aftermath of these practices.

I speak to dog and cat owners daily  who regale horror stories of the devastating effects of over vaccination. Dogs who have been diagnosed with Autoimmune Disease and were sent home to die because their Veterinarian did not understand what had caused this condition or why the dog was inflicted with the condition.

I am truly not writing this to besmirch any Veterinarian; they have a tough job to do and for the most part do their jobs well. However the Veterinary Industry and the Pet Industry apparently has no understanding of cause and effect. You overload an animal with chemicals and medications there WILL be a cause and effect and unfortunately it will lead to very unpleasant outcomes.

The article I am sharing with you below triggered my memories and experiences; it seems that my conclusions (ones which I adamantly hold to this day) almost 40 years ago are starting to be born out through studies and other anecdotal supporting evidence. I'm not saying that vaccinations are bad or that you should not vaccinate your dog or cat. I am saying that it is high time for common sense to step in a stop the egregious practices of over vaccinations and bring it to a screeching halt... enough dogs and cats have been needlessly harmed!

I encourage you to read the article below and take it seriously; what has happened in the past cannot be changed; however we can darn sure change what happens from this day forward!

 

A Hidden Vaccine Side Effect That Many Pet Owners (and Vets) Never Suspect

By Dr. Becker

Recently I ran across a sad, maddening news article discussing an increase in autoimmune disorder diagnoses by veterinarians. According to the article:

“Similar to humans, autoimmune disorders in dogs can happen suddenly. But what's different is the condition is just recently being heavily researched in dogs because they're dying from it.”1

The article discusses a 7-year-old dog named Toby who stopped eating regularly, was losing weight and became lethargic to the point of immobility.

Toby’s veterinarian immediately suspected an autoimmune disorder — a disease in which the immune system, designed to protect the body, begins attacking it instead. I’m not sure why the dog’s vet suspected an autoimmune problem right off the bat, since Toby’s symptoms can have many different causes.

Had he recently vaccinated Toby? And how many vaccinations had the dog received in his seven years?

Toby’s health was quickly declining. His veterinarian did a complete blood workup and ultrasound to check for cancer, enlarged organs and other abnormalities. Autoimmune disorders are diagnoses of exclusion, meaning all other possible underlying causes are ruled out first.

And tragically, once the diagnosis is finally made, traditional veterinary medicine has little to offer because from their perspective, “there is no known cause.” Whereas holistic veterinarians have linked vaccines to autoimmune disorders for decades, the conventional veterinary community just can’t seem to get there.

As for poor Toby and other pets like him, according to veterinarian Scott Campbell, who was interviewed for the article:

"You have about a 7 out of 10 chance that your pet is going to get better, but the reality is that this isn't going to happen anytime soon. Sometimes multiple blood transfusions are needed, which can be costly.” 2

The article wraps up by stating that Toby is “pulling through,” though his treatment is far from over. His owner seems resigned to the fact she may never know what caused his illness.

And then there’s this. Veterinarians the news writer spoke with “said testing is getting better and said it’s a learning process where they get more information with every case.” Too bad the learning process apparently doesn’t involve erring on the side of caution and foregoing unnecessary vaccine boosters.

Pets With Autoimmune Disease Are Suspicious for Over-Vaccination

Since this was just a short online news article and video put together by a local television station, I really didn’t expect an in-depth analysis of the rise of autoimmune diseases in pets. However, a glaring omission in the coverage is any mention of Toby’s vaccine status.

Any discussion of a diagnosed autoimmune disease in a pet should include information about vaccinations. We need to know how often the dog has been vaccinated, for what and how recently he received a vaccine(s).

Toby’s owner seems unaware of the connection between vaccines and autoimmune diseases in pets, which suggests her veterinarian hasn’t raised the issue with her, which leads me to believe that if Toby survives, there’s a good chance he’ll be vaccinated again in the future.

That’s not good news for Toby or any animal dealing with an autoimmune disorder.

Researchers Have Long Suspected a Link Between Vaccinations and Autoimmune Disease

Back in 1999, a team of researchers in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology at Purdue University conducted a series of experimental studies to determine if vaccination of dogs affects the function of their immune system and results in autoimmune disease. In the study introduction, the authors wrote:

“There has been a growing concern among dog owners and veterinarians that the high frequency with which dogs are being vaccinated may lead to autoimmune and other immune-mediated disorders (Dodds, 1988; Smith, 1995).

The evidence for this is largely anecdotal and based on case reports. A recent study observed a statistically significant temporal relationship between vaccination and subsequent development of immuno-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in dogs (Doval and Ciger, 1996).

Although this does not necessarily indicate a causal relationship, it is the strongest evidence to date for vaccine-induced autoimmune disease in the dog.”3

The Purdue researchers set out to evaluate whether vaccination at a young age causes alterations in the immune system of dogs, including the production of autoantibodies that could lead to autoimmune disease.

Whereas antibodies are produced by the immune system to defend the body by attacking invading pathogens such as bacteria and viruses, autoantibodies are produced by a confused immune system and attack the body itself.

Study Revealed Significant Immune System Abnormalities in Vaccinated Dogs

The study followed a group of vaccinated and a group of unvaccinated dogs for 14 weeks after the first vaccination.

The researchers discovered that the group of vaccinated dogs (but not the unvaccinated group) developed autoantibodies to several crucial, naturally-occurring biochemicals in their own bodies, including albumin, cardiolipin, collagen, cytochrome C, DNA, fibronectin and laminin.

None of the vaccinated dogs developed an autoimmune disease during the 14 weeks of experimental studies; however, they were still under 6 months of age when the study concluded. This is long before autoimmune diseases develop clinical symptoms.

The researchers concluded, “It is likely that genetic and environmental factors will trigger the onset of clinical autoimmune disease in a small percentage of the animals that develop autoantibodies.”4 You can read the full study here.

Fact: Too Many Dogs Are Receiving Too Many Vaccinations

A revved-up (overly-stimulated) immune system, which is both the goal and result of vaccines, can set the stage for disorders in which the immune system mistakes the body’s own organs for foreign invaders, and attacks them. Autoimmune diseases can affect a wide variety of tissues in the body, including blood, joints and muscles, nervous system, thyroid, adrenal glands, kidneys, liver, bowel, reproductive organs, eyes, skin and mucous membranes.

While a safe, individualized vaccination program is important for every pet, research shows that dogs and cats absolutely do not require annual re-vaccinations to keep them protected from disease.

However, even though feline and canine vaccination guidelines have been modified in recent years, too many veterinarians still recommend annual (or even more frequent) re-vaccinations, and too many pet parents comply. According to Dr. Jean Dodds, world-renowned pet healthcare and vaccine expert:

“ … [T]he truth is that once your dog has completed his puppy series (or kitten series for cats) for the core vaccines, there is a good chance his body will maintain immunity to these diseases for life.

Yet, many well-intentioned people continue to follow the advice of some eterinarians and give their adult dogs and cats annual (or even semi-annual) vaccine boosters. This can result in over-vaccination and a variety of potentially damaging — and in some cases, even life-threatening — adverse reactions (referred to as ‘vaccinosis’).5

Dodds covers the two most common types of vaccines, modified live-virus (MLV) vaccines and killed vaccines, here, where she also lists the dog breeds at highest risk for vaccine-related diseases.

The Canine Vaccination Protocol I Recommend

Veterinary vaccine expert Dr. Ronald Schultz suggests the ideal scenario is to titer pregnant females to determine the exact time maternal antibody levels will fall in their pups and vaccines will be effective to immunize the litter.

This is optimal, because we can completely avoid giving ineffective vaccines, which occurs when puppies still have high levels of maternal antibodies that prevent vaccines from stimulating antibody production. This is a common issue when puppies are vaccinated between 5 and 8 weeks of age.

In many cases, one well-timed vaccine can stimulate adequate protection, but knowing when to give the inoculation is critical. However, for many people who rescue puppies this won’t be possible, so we must guess when maternal antibodies are gone and give two or three inoculations to stimulate antibody production. During this “window of opportunity” for infectious diseases, the puppy’s immune system is vulnerable.

I recommend giving one parvo and distemper vaccine between 9 and 12 weeks of age and a second parvo and distemper four weeks later when the puppy is between 13 and 16 weeks old. There are some breeds (e.g., Rottweilers and pit bulls) that may benefit from an additional parvo booster at 18 weeks of age, a recommendation Dodds suggests.

Alternatively, some holistic veterinarians like me are pushing the second booster back to 16 to 18 weeks of age instead of giving a third parvo vaccine. Any physical changes that occur after any vaccine should be immediately addressed. I use homeopathy to counteract any potential vaccine reactions, but there are other methods of detoxification that other practitioners use.

Schultz suggests titering for parvo and distemper from two to four weeks after the last puppy shot to assure the immune system responded adequately. Most holistic vets (including me) prefer to wait and give a rabies vaccine at 6 months of age.

If the puppy wasn’t titered two to four weeks after her last puppy shot, then titering at one year is advisable, and every three years thereafter. Dodds suggests boosting certain breeds again at 1 year of age, but I would only advise this if a dog’s titer at one year is negligible.

As for the non-core vaccines, for example, canine flu vaccines, bordetella, Lyme and leptospirosis, I don't recommend any of them. Several non-core vaccines are only available in combination with other vaccines, some of which are core. I recommend you check with your veterinarian to insure no non-core vaccines are being piggy-backed on the core vaccines your dog receives.

Most traditional veterinarians don’t carry single vaccines (just parvo) or even minimally coupled vaccines (distemper and parvo together), so ask to see the vaccine vial before assuming your pet is only receiving one or two agents at a time. Under no circumstances should a dog with an existing disease or illness, especially an autoimmune disorder, be vaccinated for anything.

 

Article Source: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2016/10/15/autoimmune-disease-dogs.aspx

Cancer drug for dogs show promise for people

Cancer drug for dogs show promise for people

ST. PAUL, Minn. - University of Minnesota researchers developed and tested a cancer drug that they believe could someday help patients live longer and with fewer side effects.

You wouldn't know it walking into a room full of playful pups at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine, but all are battling cancer. Now, many of their owners now get to spend significantly more time with them.

“We just never expected it was going to work as well as it did,” said Jaime Modiano, a U of M Vet School researcher, who along with his colleague Antonella Borgatti, led a study treating dogs with HSA Sarcoma, a fast-spreading incurable cancer.

They used a drug called eBAT, developed by another U of M professor. The results amazed them.

“I don't think I've ever been so excited in my life,” Modiano said.

Only 30 percent of dogs who get this cancer survive six months after being diagnosed. But if given the drug, 70 percent have lived that long.

And one of the dogs treated with eBAT four years ago is still alive. Modiano calls it unprecedented. The bigger picture in this study is what this breakthrough could mean for people. 

“The hope is that we'll be able to translate this drug for human use,” Borgatti said.

“This drug has potential to help people with a wide variety of cancers,” Modiano said.

The canine HSA Sarcoma is very similar to forms of sarcoma in people. The professors are optimistic it will work as well as it did with the dogs -- extending life, with fewer side-effects than other drugs on the market.

“Our goal and our vision is to create a world where we no longer fear cancer. And every time we create a new treatment that creates hope, we help to reduce the fear of cancer,” Modiano said.

(© 2017 KARE)

Article Sources:

http://www.kare11.com/news/health/u-of-m-cancer-breakthrough-amazes-researchers/408391305

http://www.ksdk.com/news/health/u-of-m-cancer-breakthrough-amazes-researchers/408529378

http://mct.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2017/02/13/1535-7163.MCT-16-0637

Worst Pet Food Ingredients

Worst Pet Food Ingredients

I ran across this article recently; I found it a valuable resource and a MUST read for ALL pet owners!

 

Worst pet food ingredients

The following list of pet food ingredients and ratings was created by a cooperative effort between pet food formulator Dr. Lisa Newman, N.D., Ph.D. (www.Azmira.com), Mike Adams (www.HealthRanger.org) and the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center (www.ConsumerWellness.org). Mike Adams and the CWC analyzed the ingredients of 448 popular pet food products sold in the United States and organized them by frequency. Dr. Newman then provided a nutritional analysis and comment for each ingredient.

salt (1 stars) found in 69% of pet food products analyzed
Used to cover up rancid meat and fat, can cause kidney and heart disease, hypertension -- used to encourage cats to drink, source of sodium chloride.

sucrose (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar --leads to hyperactivity, addiction to food (sugar rush), weight gain.

partially hydrogenated soybean oil (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cases digestive upset, premature aging.

tetra sodium pyrophosphate (1 stars) found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Is a rust stain remover used in cleaning products (TSP)!!!! Why is it in food? Emulsification of rendered animal fats! Very toxic, causes nausea and diarrhea.

corn syrup (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
A "sugar" that causes diabetes, weight gain, hyperactivity, fearful behavior, ill health.

corn (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Inexpensive feed-grade can include moldy grain or fungus which has cause death.

yellow 5 (1 stars) found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial color, a salicylate which can be become deadly to cats with extended use.

blue 2 (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Carcinogenic, artificial color.

blue 2 and other color (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Carcinogenic.

eucalyptus oil (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Not an essential oil meant for ingesting!

sodium bisulfate (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Used as disinfectant!

smoke flavor (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates flavor which can potentially become carcinogenic, retards bacteria on rancid meat.

dried meat by-product (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can include tumors and diseased tissues, rancid trim pieces and innards of various animals.

dried plain beet pulp (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Pure sugar filler -- leads to weight gain, hyperactivity and feeds arthritis.

sea salt (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Used to cover up rancid meat and fat, can cause kidney and heart disease, hypertension -- used to encourage cats to drink, source of sodium chloride.

salmon meal (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Concentrated source of protein and a few fatty acids (oil has been pressed out) but can add mercury to the diet.

salmon (1 stars) found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
A source of protein and fatty acids which can add mercury to the diet.

dried whey (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can encourage allergies, cheap protein source from cow's milk.

dicalcium phosphate (1 stars) found in 26% of pet food products analyzed
Can become toxic to body -- texturizer in can food.

ethoxyquin (a preservative) (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
The most carcinogenic preservative, most in industry have stopped using it except very cheap, poor quality foods.

sodium chloride (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Table salt -- used to cover up rancid meat and fat, can cause kidney and heart disease, hypertension -- used to encourage cats to drink.

fish (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, probably rancid and of poor quality. Can have high levels of mercury.

rice hulls (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can be harsh on intestines.

rice gluten (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can encourage diabetes, a poor protein source/filler.

rice flour (1 stars) found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, causes bowel distress and can lead to diabetes in dogs.

rice bran (1 stars) found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can lead to digestive upset.

rice (1 stars) found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can cause diabetes in dogs, often indicates poorest quality possible.

red 40 and other color (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Is a carcinogen.

red 40 (1 stars) found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial color, carcinogenic.

red 3 (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Carcinogenic color.

rabbit by products (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Includes tumors, ears, carcass, etc.

egg product (1 stars) found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of protein, waste product of egg industry, free of shell.

soybean hulls (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, harsh on intestines.

DL-alpha tocopherol acetate (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Synthetic source, non-nutritive.

sugar (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar?!! Leads to diabetes, hyperactivity and obesity. Can feed arthritis. BAD.

DL-alpha tocopherol acetate [source of vitamin E] (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Synthetic source, non-nutritive. Used generally as a "natural" preservative.

dried animal digest (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Flavor enhancer. Is non-descriptive, digest is rendered animal tissue, including rancid or diseased parts.

starch (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest form of carbohydrates causes weight gain and poor digestion, filler.

dried beet pulp (1 stars) found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product. Cheap filler/fiber-causes sugar rush/addiction to food, hyperactivity and allergies.

dried beet pulp (sugar removed) (1 stars) found in 25% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product. Cheapest, most common filler used, still contains enough sugar residue to cause problems such as hyperactivity and blood sugar imbalances.

dried brewers yeast (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can become toxic to liver, waste product of beer and ale industry.

dried capsicum (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cayenne powder, can burn stomach.

sodium carbonate (1 stars) found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Neutralizer for rancid fats, similar to lye.

dried cellulose (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Very harsh on digestive tract, suspected to include cardboard or peanut hulls.

dried grape pomace (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Grapes can be deadly to dogs.

soy hulls (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can cause bowel irritation, cheap filler.

soy flour (1 stars) found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of grain protein, filler, can cause bloat/death in dogs.

sorbitol (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetener and binder.

sodium tripolyphosphate (1 stars) found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Used as rancid meat preservative.

menadione dimethylpyrimidinol bisulfite (source of vitamin K activity) (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Least beneficial source of Vitamin K activity needed for proper blood clotting.

sodium phosphate (1 stars) found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Non-digestible source of phosphorous (vital to maintaining acid/alkalinity pH).

sodium nitrite (for color retention). (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially highly carcinogenic.

sodium nitrite (for color retention) (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially highly carcinogenic.

sodium hexametaphosphate (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of phosphorus can become deadly to dogs -- emulsifier, texturizer.

propylene glycol (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Adds sweetness to food, used in antifreeze! Some preservative action, possible carcinogen.

soybean mill run (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
This is the sweepings off the floor-cheap filler, poor source of protein.

manganous oxide calcium iodate (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Often used in bleaching tallow.

fish oil (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive type of fish can include rancid source of "throw away" catches.

iodized salt (1 stars) found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Used to cover rancid meats and fats, get cats to drink more - causes kidney dysfunction, hypertension.

iron oxide (1 stars) found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Can be cultivated from rust!

L-alanine (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-essential amino acid used as supplement in heavy grain-based foods but causes cancer in lab mice.

lamb by-product (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Contains everything internal but the muscle meat including diseased tissue, tumors, etc.

onion powder (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can be deadly to dogs, non-nutritive.

onion extract (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Onions can be deadly to dogs.

liver (1 stars) found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source can include any mammal tissue, too much liver can become toxic to the body when used in dry foods, used as flavor, minimal source of iron.

L-lysine monohydrochloride (1 stars) found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of Lysine (essential amino acid found in meat), cheaper to use for food enrichment for grain-based foods.

pasta (wheat flour) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, gimmicky filler that can cause allergies, feeds arthritis.

magnesium oxide (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Has caused tumors in lab rats, antacid.

peanut hulls 10.8% (source of fiber) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can harm the digestive tract, cheap fiber.

maple syrup (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar, causes weight gain, hyperactivity, feeds cancer and arthritis, should not be used in food or supplements, only treats.

meat and bone meal (natural source of calcium) (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive indicates 4-D meat, cheapest source, can include diseased tissues plus bone meal can not be digested and assimilated as calcium!

meat and liver meal (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can include tumors and diseased tissues, rancid trim pieces and liver of various animals, concentrated.

natural and artificial flavors (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Poor quality of flavor additive, artificial flavors can be carcinogenic.

natural and artificial chicken flavor (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial flavors can cause severe illness, become carcinogenic.

monosodium phosphate (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Used as emulsifying agent.

meat by-products (1 stars) found in 18% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive indicates 4-D meat, cheapest source, can include diseased tissues (tumors) and organs.

molasses (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Added to foods or high on the list of supplements creates blood sugar imbalance, causes diabetes, hyperactivity, best used in treats, not foods or supplements.

modified starch (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of carbohydrates, filler, causes digestive upset.

modified food starch (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source can be from any grain, causes allergies, weight gain and poor digestion, filler.

lysine (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates heavy soy-based food which dogs can die from unless they have lysine to help digest it, best to avoid this diet unless soy is missing.

fresh chicken by-products (organ meat only) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality hidden behind "organ meat only" and "fresh" still by-products which can include diseased organ tissue.

sorbic acid (a preservative) (1 stars) found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
A mold and yeast inhibitor.

propyl gallate and citric acid (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical preservative, can cause digestive upset, stomach irritation, deceptive adding with natural Vitamin C.

propionic acid (a preservative) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially harmful mold inhibitor.

powdered cellulose (11.1% source of fiber) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Suspected to include recycled cardboard.

powdered cellulose (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler/source of fiber, suspected to include cardboard, causes irritable bowel problems.

poultry liver (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of liver flavoring, non-descriptive, often includes diseased tissues. Can become toxic to body.

poultry fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols) (1 stars) found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, can be any foul, often rancid prior to preserving with Vitamin E (gimmicky, to cover poor quality fat used).

poultry fat (preserved with BHA) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript fat, possible carcinogenic preservative.

poultry by-products (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, can include dead, diseased foul, all internal parts void of healthy meat, includes feet and beaks.

poultry by-product meal (1 stars) found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, can include dead, diseased foul, all internal parts void of healthy meat, includes feet and beaks, concentrated.

hydrochloric acid (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Corrosive ingredient used as modifier for food starch, gelatin, as a pH adjuster and conversion of corn starch to syrup.

food starch (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source can be from any grain, causes allergies, weight gain and poor digestion, cheap filler.

fish oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols) (1 stars) found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, cheap "fish" source, often rancid prior to preserving with Vitamin E (gimmicky to cover poor quality oil).

glycerin (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetens food, used as humectant (keeps food moist), interferes with nutrient assimilation.

glycerine (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetens food, used as humectant (keeps food moist), interferes with nutrient assimilation.

glyceryl monostearate (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
An emulsifier (breaks down fats), lethal to lab rats, still under investigation by FDA.

glycine (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-essential amino acid used as antacid, indicates very poor quality food.

ground corn (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Is not "whole ground," this is misleading, often indicates poor quality, can cause allergies.

pork liver (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest source of flavoring, some iron, hard to digest. Liver can become toxic to the body.

pork by-products (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Can contain non-human-edible parts, diseased organs and tissues, pork's not the best meat for pets.

phosphoric acid (1 stars) found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
A sequestering agent for rendered animal fats -- implies poor quality fats are used, source of phosphorous.

ground rice (1 stars) found in 17% of pet food products analyzed
Filler -- has been linked to diabetes, always indicates white rice, not whole grain but usually floor sweepings from rice industry.

petrolatum (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Vaseline! Mild laxative effect when ingested. Petroleum is a carcinogen.

poultry (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Can include any foul, non-descriptive, often includes diseased meat, non-human grade.

caramel (1 stars) found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar-based adds to hyperactivity, or can be prepared by ammonia process associated with blood toxicity in lab rats.

cellulose powder (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Harsh on bowels, suspected to include recycled cardboard.

beef tallow (preserved with BHA) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
One of the worse kinds of fat, chemically preserved with potential carcinogen. Often produces allergies.

beef tallow (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Tallow, includes old restaurant grease, is very hard to digest, leads to diarrhea, premature aging.

beef by-products (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can include any internal part of the cow other than the meat, often from 4-D, rancid sources.

calcium chloride (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Used as a source of calcium but can cause digestive upset, heart issues.

calcium propionate (a preservative) (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical. Potentially carcinogenic, antifungal.

calcium sulfate (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Plaster of Paris! Firming agent.

beef tallow preserved with BHA and mixed-tocopherols (source of vitamin E) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Terrible source of fat, chemically preserved with potential carcinogen but uses "Vitamin E" to mislead consumer. Indicates very poor quality product.

whole rice (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality white rice which can cause diabetes in dogs.

water (1 stars) found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Used as non-nutritive filler in food. UGH!

caramel color (1 stars) found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar-based or can be prepared by ammonia process associated with blood toxicity in lab rats.

venison by-products (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Contains all meat not fit for human consumption, diseased organs, tumors, promotes premature aging.

vegetable oil (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source of fat, contains saturated fat which is hard on the body, causes premature aging.

beet pulp (sugar removed) (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Fiber/filler, stills contains enough sugar for rush/addiction to food and hyperactivity.

turmeric (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky spice to aid digestion.

brewers yeast extract (saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation solubles) (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Liquid left over from brewery process, condensed. Can become toxic to the liver.

cellulose (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Harsh on bowels, suspected to include recycled cardboard. Can also be crushed peanut hulls.

turkey by-product meal (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can include carcass, feet, beaks and diseased turkey organs, tumors.

cane molasses (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
SUGAR!!! Leads to weight gain, hyperactivity and feeds arthritis, best used in treats, not supplements or foods.

wheat middlings (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sweepings off the floor causes allergies and digestive upset.

beet pulp (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar-filled fiber/filler, can lead to hyperactivity and diabetes. Can be addicting to some pets.

beets (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Implies whole beet is more nutritious than beet pulp alone but still contains sugar which can lead to weight gain, diabetes, hyperactivity.

BHA (a preservative) (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical. Highly carcinogenic preservative.

Chicken by-product (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, diseased internal organs, beaks and feet.

wheat starch (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Poor carbohydrate source causes allergies.

dextrose (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar, feeds cancer, causes hyperactivity, weight gain.

beef tallow preserved with mixed-tocopherols (source of vitamin E) (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Beef tallow can be used restaurant fat! Misleading with "natural" Vitamin E preservative added. Indicates very poor quality product.

bacon flavors (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Does not say "natural" so it's possibly artificial, can be a carcinogen.

wheat gluten (1 stars) found in 28% of pet food products analyzed
Poor protein source, used as a cheap, non-nutritive filler -- causes allergies.

bone meal (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-digestible source of calcium can lead to digestive upset. Can be from 4-D sources.

wheat flour (1 stars) found in 18% of pet food products analyzed
Poorly digested filler, can cause allergies and bowel problems.

wheat bran (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality food, can cause allergies, best to have whole wheat.

brewer’s rice (1 stars) found in 31% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product from breweries, cheap, non-nutritive filler can be harsh on intestines and lead to diabetes.

brewers dried yeast (1 stars) found in 34% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product (used for flavoring, protein, B-vitamins) which can become very toxic to the liver causes allergies and arthritis.

water sufficient for processing (1 stars) found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Robs protein from can food since it is used as non-nutritive filler instead.

brewers yeast (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product (used for flavoring, protein, B-vitamins) which can become very toxic to the liver causes allergies and arthritis.

wheat mill run (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sweepings off the floor, causes allergies, digestive upset and feeds arthritis, leads to premature aging.

corn oil (preserved with TBHQ) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
TBHQ contains petroleum-derived butane, can be carcinogenic.

corn gluten (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Highly allergenic, adds sugar, is a poor protein source, interferes with digestion.

yellow 6 (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial color, potentially carcinogenic food colorant.

corn gluten meal (1 stars) found in 31% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product, cheap, non-nutritive filler but used as protein source -- can cause allergies and sugar imbalance.

titanium dioxide color (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially carcinogenic artificial color used as white pigment.

titanium dioxide (1 stars) found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially carcinogenic artificial color used as white pigment.

animal fat (preserved with vitamin E) (1 stars) found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source indicates 4-D fat, regardless of "natural" preservative it is rancid, often from diseased tissue. Misleading to be preserved with vitamin E.

animal fat (preserved with vitamin E mixed tocopherols) (1 stars) found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, cheap animal source, often rancid prior to preserving with Vitamin E (gimmicky to cover poor quality fat).

animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source, often rancid to begin with, regardless of natural preservative use afterwards, misleading.

animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid) (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive fat! Can be anything rancid or 4-D (dead, dying, disabled, diseased) regardless of natural Vitamin E and C preservatives. Misleading.

yellow 5 and other color (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Possible carcinogens.

thiamine hydrochloride (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest, poorly assimilated source of Thiamine, Vitamin B-1, needed for nervous system and mental attitude.

corn starch (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Terrible filler, causes several health issues including allergies.

corn starch-modified (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of nutrients, protein, filler, binder.

animal fat (preserved with BHA/BHT) (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive fat source, indicates 4-D source chemically preserved with carcinogens.

tallow (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Causes poor health, disrupts digestion, can include rancid restaurant grease. Very bad fat source!

animal fat (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source indicates 4-D fat chemically preserved, difficult to digest, potentially carcinogenic.

animal digest (1 stars) found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Rendered, by chemical and/or enzymatic process, non-descriptive animal tissues used for flavor.

corn grits (1 stars) found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of protein and carbohydrates, filler.

chicken by-products (organ meat only), fresh (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can be poor quality hidden behind "organ meat only" and "fresh" still by-products which can include diseased organ tissue, tumors.

yeast culture (1 stars) found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Flavoring, source of protein, potentially toxic to the liver.

trace minerals (potassium chloride) (1 stars) found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Source of potassium to balance pH, small intestinal ulcers may occur, indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

chicken flavors (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates artificial flavor which can be a carcinogen.

trace minerals (sodium tripolyphoshate) (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, potentially harmful source of phosphorous indicates lack of well-rounded supplements.

artificial flavor (1 stars) found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can become carcinogenic. Produces allergies.

chicken by-product meal (1 stars) found in 23% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, internal organs, beaks, feet. Concentrated.

Note: "Gimmick" or "Gimmicky" means this ingredient is listed on the label in order to hype the product to human buyers, but is usually not present in large enough quantities to be effective in any meaningful way.

Melatonin, Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula and Fish Oil Therapy for Canine Alopecia (Hair Loss in Dogs) - It works!

Melatonin, Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula and Fish Oil Therapy for Canine Alopecia (Hair Loss in Dogs) - It works!

Veterinarians and pet owners alike are experiencing success using the therapy described here for canine alopecia (hair loss in dogs).

The most common form of canine alopecia is seasonal alopecia, also called cyclic follicular dysplasia.  This condition is denoted by hair loss on a dog’s flanks and back. Hair loss can also occur on the base of the tail, nose, and ears. Usually the skin becomes darker in the areas where the hair loss has occurred, and the dog’s hair will become dry and coarse.

Some breeds of dogs are more likely to be affected by seasonal alopecia than others. Bulldogs, boxers, schnauzers, Airedales, labradors, Scottish terriers, Akitas and Doberman pinschers are more susceptible than many other breeds.

Canine seasonal alopecia usually starts in early spring or late fall and lasts for up to six months, with the the dog’s hair typically growing back in afterward.  Sometimes the condition recurs year after year, and sometimes it only occurs once in the dog’s lifetime. Because many dogs become affected with seasonal alopecia in the spring, researchers have concluded that lack of sunlight may be a cause.

Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland that helps regulate hormones and the body’s circadian rhythm. It is being used in veterinary medicine as a natural treatment for coat loss in dogs, cats and ferrets. Researchers are not exactly sure how melatonin helps thicken and regrow fur.  Some researchers think it may be the relationship between melatonin, sunlight, and the body’s circadian rhythm.  Other’s feel that melatonin’s antioxidant properties help promote hair growth. Melatonin has also been shown to help a pet gain back weight after surgery, stress or illness and help with anxiety, insomnia, and noise phobias. Mink farmers have been known to use melatonin to promote thick coats in the winter.

Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula

Dr Kruger Healthy Skin Formula contains the same vitamins, minerals, digestive enzymes and live cultures as the Original Formula but has added Milled Flaxseed and d-Biotin to improve the quality, shine and thickness of the dog’s coat.  Recommended for dogs older than 6 months with a low to moderate work level.  Along with better nutritional absorption of food, daily, long-term use will show an improved and sustained quality of coat, helping your dog to restore the hair lost due to this condition.  It is also excellent for dogs that live in colder climates to increase coat coverage for protection.

With Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula is ideal for any dog that suffers from skin and coat problems such as dry, itchy skin, excessive shedding and Seasonal Alopecia.  Daily use will help to bring your dog's coat back to full growth.

  • RELIEVES DRY, ITCHY SKIN
  • REDUCES EXCESSIVE SHEDDING
  • PROMOTES PROPER COAT QUALITY & GROWTH
  • IMPROVES DIGESTION & NUTRIENT ABSORPTION
  • NON-GMO ALL NATURAL FORMULA
  • DETOXIFIES ANIMALS INTESTINAL TRACT
  • BOOSTS THE IMMUNE SYSTEM 

Recommended Dosage:

1 to 1 ½ scoops ( 1 to 1 ½ Teaspoons) per one cup of food.

Added to each meal (everyday)

Fish Oil Supplement for Dogs with Natural Vitamin E

Omega-3 fatty acids have been extensively researched and can help support skin and coat issues in dogs.

Studies have shown that fatty acids are vital for maintaining normal skin structure and function, and high doses can help support your pet's coat by helping pruritus (itching) and alopecia (bald spots).

You should seek out a premium fish oil that is virtually odorless. Oil that is crafted in Iceland from sustainably caught, wild ocean fish. Packed with natural source vitamin E from non-GMO Argentinian sunflowers, a powerful and biologically active antioxidant.

Free from soy, wheat, corn, artificial flavors and preservatives. Higher in EPA and DHA than salmon, Pollock, krill, and cod liver oil, so your pet consumes less calories. Oil is human grade, wild caught, and sustainably fished. Manufactured in a 100% carbon neutral, ISO-9001, and GMP-certified facility. So you can ensure that your dog gets nothing but the absolute best product.

Recommended Dosage: 1 pump per 20 lbs of body weight. This needs to be added to every meal.


Melatonin

Recommended Dosage: Research recommends not exceeding a dosage of 3 to 6 mg every 8 to 12 hours.

A general guideline is:

  • 1.5 mg for dogs under 25 lbs
  • 3 mg for an average medium to large sized dog 26-99 lbs
  • 6 mg if the dog’s weight exceeds 100 lbs

This dose can be given once or twice daily.

If given once daily, the recommendation is to dose in the evening.

Please remember, though, that every pet is different and it is always best to consult with your veterinarian for the best possible dosage of Melatonin for your pet’s individual situation. Adjustments may need to be made for particular health situations and/or medications.

Side Effects:  There have been no reports of significant side effects of melatonin use in dogs. There have been a few reports of minor gastric upset and sleepiness. Melatonin has been shown to slightly alter the time an un-spayed female comes into heat. Melatonin may also interact with corticosteroids and some internal body process. Melatonin is not recommended for use in breeding dogs because it has been shown to sometimes alter mating desire and when a dog comes into heat.

Signs of Melatonin Overdosage:  It is very important not to exceed the recommended amount of melatonin.  Be very careful when choosing your melatonin product. Many of the melatonin products sold for humans are much stronger than the recommended amount for dogs. Signs of overdosage include diarrhea, vomiting, high blood pressure, incoordination, and even possibly seizures.

Note: It is always best to consult with your veterinarian before concluding that your pet has a particular ailment. In the case of Canine Alopecia, you should make sure that your veterinarian rules out thyroid disease, Cushing’s disease, parasites, mites and certain bacteria.  All of these can cause symptoms similar to Canine Seasonal Alopecia. To test for thyroid or Cushing’s disease, your veterinarian will need to perform a blood test; for parasites, mites and certain bacterias a skin sample may need to be taken.

The regimen described here has a proven track record of working on mild to severe cases of  seasonal alopecia. Based on our experience dealing with this issue; the following is the most common and effective treatment.

Mild Cases:  Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula only resolves the hair loss issue.

Medium or more stubborn cases: Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula and Fish Oil appears to resolve the issue.

Severe Cases: Dr Kruger Healthy Skin & Coat Formula, Fish Oil and Melatonin appears to be the combination that has the greatest positive effect on extreme cases of seasonal alopecia,

Natural Approach to Managing Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) - UPDATE !!!

Natural Approach to Managing Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) - UPDATE !!!

*** BLOG UPDATE ***  -  November 2017

Since we first published this blog post January of 2017, we have developed, tested and successfully launched a formula specifically to help dogs who are susceptible or already have DM!

Why use our (DM) Defense and Support Formula?

This formula is based on the already successfully proven benefits of Healthy Joint Formula which has helped dogs reduce the effects of Degenerative Myelopathy.  This new formula provides all of the proven benefits of Healthy Joint Formula with the added scientifically confirmed benefits of the highest quality Spirulina.

Spirulina delivers 60% protein and an excellent source of vitamins A, K1, K2, B12, iron, manganese and chromium. A rich source of health-giving phytonutrients such as carotenoids, GLA, SOD and phycocyanin and contains:

  • 2800% more beta-carotene than carrots
  • 600% more protein than tofu
  • 3900% more iron than spinach
  • 280% more antioxidants than blueberries
  • 550 times more powerful than vitamin E
  • 800 times stronger than CoQ10
  • 6000 times greater than vitamin C
  • 11 times stronger than beta-carotene
  • 550 times more powerful than green tea catechins

 

Description:

Degenerative Myelopathy is a devastating disease. Affected dogs develop weakness in the rear legs and gradually become paralyzed. Eventually they can’t control their bowels and lose motor control on the entire upper half of the body. This degenerative process can take anywhere from six months to three years.

There is ongoing research for this disease and there is evidence suggesting that Degenerative Myelopathy is an inflammatory autoimmune disease. There is a nerve sheath (called myelin) that surrounds and insulates the nerve fibers of the spinal cord and is necessary for the conduction of nerve impulses. What happens in Degenerative Myelopathy is the dog’s own immune system cells attack the spinal cord sheath. This creates an accumulation of inflammatory cells locally and the chronic inflammation destroys the myelin sheath, leading to progressive nerve tissue damage. The damage typically begins in the middle of the back and this is where the most severe damage can be found. The nerve damage results in loss of voluntary and involuntary motor control. Some neurologists compare Degenerative Myelopathy in dogs to Multiple Sclerosis in humans.

Commonly Affected Breeds

There are about 43 breeds that have been found to have the defective gene responsible for Degenerative Myelopathy. The breeds most often affected include;

  • German Shepherd
  • Boxer
  • Chesapeake Bay Retriever
  • Rhodesian Ridgeback
  • Irish Setter
  • Dalmatian
  • Weimaraner
  • Great Pyrenees
  • Samoyed
  • Briard
  • Siberian Husky
  • Miniature Poodle
  • Standard Poodle
  • Bernese Mountain Dog
  • Kerry Blue Terrier
  • Golden Retriever
  • Wire Fox Terrier
  • American Eskimo Dog
  • Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
  • Pug

Diagnosis

The diagnostic tests that are normally performed are blood work (including a thyroid panel) and spinal X-rays. Other tests may include an electromyogram (EMG), MRI or CT, myelogram, and spinal tap to help rule out other spinal diseases, such as Intervertebral Disc Disease, spinal cord tumors, Degenerative Lumbosacral Syndrome, and Degenerative Joint Diseases as in Dysplasia.

If your vet highly suspects Degenerative Myelopathy, a blood sample can be submitted to the veterinary school at the University of Missouri to test for the mutant gene – or dogs can be screened with a cheek swab sample.

Symptoms

Degenerative Myelopathy initially affects the rear legs first. The dog may start to drag a foot on walks and the owner can hear or see this. The two middle nails on that weak paw may be worn down. Eventually, a lack of coordination and wobbliness in the gait is seen and the reflexes will slow in the hind feet and legs. Soon afterward, the thigh muscles will start to atrophy and the tail may be limp.

As the disease progresses, the dog will have difficulty standing for long periods of time and getting up from lying down. Fecal and urinary incontinence inevitably follow. The rear legs become so weak that the dog will need assistance to get up and he will have trouble holding a position to defecate or urinate (affected dogs often walk and poop).

As the disease progresses, the front limbs will start to become affected and weaken as well. Normally, the dog is so debilitated by this point that most patients are euthanized because of poor quality of life. Thankfully, this disease is not painful but there may be compensatory issues that will eventually cause discomfort since the dog’s biomechanics will change and tissues will be overused.

Holistic Treatments

There is no conventional veterinary medicine treatment for Degenerative Myelopathy. Holistic veterinarians use their skills and modalities to improve the quality of life. There is no need for pain meds (usually) or steroids. Treatments that do help and are readily available include acupuncture, exercise, diet and nutraceuticals.

  • Acupuncture can help by stimulating the nervous system. More than likely, electroacupuncture will be used. The acupuncture needles are inserted and then small electrodes are connected to a few needles to create a microcurrent between them. This drives the acupuncture effect deeper and is very beneficial for paralyzed or partially paralyzed patients. This is performed once or twice a week for a few sessions in a row. 
  • Exercise is probably the most important modality for affected dogs. The nervous system has to be constantly stimulated to keep the nerve impulses firing. There is now documentation showing that physiotherapy can improve symptoms and prolongs the length of time that the dog remains mobile.
  • Hydrotherapy is the safest and most effective form of exercise for these patients. Free swimming and underwater treadmill therapy have many advantages to the nervous and musculoskeletal system and the properties of water make it the safest form of exercise.

Walks and structured therapeutic exercise are very important to maintain balance and proprioception, flexibility of the joints, keep muscles toned, and maintain good circulation. Eventually, a cart may enable the dog to remain active and maintain its quality of life once weakness or paralysis of the hind legs sets in.

The Importance of Nutrition

  • A balanced nutritional protocol will support the body and help control inflammation and regulate the immune system. First and foremost, the quality of protein needs to be evaluated. The higher the bioavailability of the protein, the better off the dog will be. The digestion process takes a lot of energy and creates a lot of heat which is not what the body needs, so the less work the intestines have to do, the better. Since Degenerative Myelopathy is potentially a problem with an over-reactive immune system, you want to give your dog anti-inflammatory ingredients. One of the most profound and effective is PUFAS (polyunsaturated fatty acids). They are required (essential) in the diet because they are not produced by the body. The most important is Omega-3 essential fatty acid from fish oil because it gets broken down to anti-inflammatory prostaglandins.
  • Inflammation anywhere in the body creates free radicals which are unstable electrons that can cause damage to cell DNA and cause cell death. Antioxidants can neutralize the free radicals and help maintain proper levels. Some antioxidants beneficial to Degenerative Myelopathy-affected dogs or to help prevent the development of the disease are: ascorbic acid (vitamin C), vitamin E, vitamin A, carotenoids, selenium, glutathione peroxidase, super oxide dismutase, coenzyme Q 10, S- Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe), N-Acetylcysteine, and taurine. Most of these antioxidants are found in fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Another important ingredient, MSM (methylsulfonylmethane), is an effective anti-inflammatory substance that is naturally found in protein from red meat, poultry, eggs, legumes, garlic, onions (but not for dogs!), Brussels sprouts, asparagus, kale and wheat germ.

Lecithin is composed of fatty substances and phospholipids which make up a portion of the nerve cell wall membrane. It may provide building blocks for the myelin sheath and nerve tissue in the spinal cord. Most unprocessed nuts, unprocessed grains, unprocessed soy, and eggs contain lecithin.

Dr Kruger Pet Supplements Helps Dogs with DM utilizing  All Natural, Organic, NON-GMO, Human Grade Quality Ingredients !

 Since 1986 Dr Kruger Pet Supplements has been providing supplements that help a dog achieve and maintain proper health and natural balance as required by nature. Our customers with breeds that have a predisposition to Degenerative Myelopathy or have already developed this disease utilize the Healthy Skin & Coat Formula and our Canine Degenerative Myelopathy Formula to assist in addressing the issues that Degenerative Myelopathy is noted for in dogs.

                                                   

As a preventative measure; customers start their puppies (after 6 months of age) on these formulas to build up their bodies and immune system. This will help your dog by providing the necessary systems support through its life.

After being diagnosed with Degenerative Myelopathy;  customers start their dogs on these formulas to improve the quality of life for their dogs. Provide the dogs with the systems support, immune support and mobility support that is most critical for a dog with  Degenerative Myelopathy.

Dosage Recommendation;  You never want to exceed 1 ½ scoops (teaspoons) per one cup of food. The most common way it is given;

1 full scoop of Canine Degenerative Myelopathy Formula and ½ scoop of Healthy Skin & Coat Formula per one cup of food.

3 Golden Rules that lead to success using any of the Dr Kruger Pet Supplements Formulas

  1. The formulas are dosed based on the amount of food your pet eats per meal; this is the only true way to determine the proper amount of supplement/s your pet should be getting. Your goal is to get your dog up to 1 full scoop per one cup of food and your cat up to the equivalent amount of supplement/s based on the amount of food being fed.
  1. This will not work if you are trying to give supplements to more than one pet in a "free feeding" environment. This is based on predictive feeding as explained above.
  1. You must follow our dosage instructions; your pet must have the supplement/s on every meal; skipping days or only giving the supplement/s on one meal a day (unless your pet only gets one meal a day) will not be sufficient for the supplement/s to do their job properly.

 For more information about Dr Kruger Pet Supplements Formulas go to http://www.drkruger.com

 

Article sources:  A Natural Approach to Managing Degenerative Myelopathy Holistic Care - By Dr Julie Mayer;  Dr Kruger Pet Supplements - www.drkruger.com
New medication ‘a breakthrough' for canine cancer

New medication ‘a breakthrough' for canine cancer

I recently ran across this article that was published on 1/5/2017; this is huge news for dog owners. Especially with breeds that tend to have a predisposition for developing cancer!

Original article;

 

New medication ‘a breakthrough' for canine cancer

KUSA - Colorado State University is calling a newly approved lymphoma medication a breakthrough in canine cancer.

Tanovea-CA1 is the first drug approved by the FDA for treatment of canine lymphoma. It will be available to veterinarians nationwide this spring and could give a new hope to owners of dogs with cancer.

CSU veterinarians and Fort Collins-based company Vet DC helped bring the new drug to market. The university’s Flint Animal Cancer Center led the medication's clinical trials.

"Dogs with lymphoma are very sick dogs and they usually present and are noticeably show that their lymph nodes are very swollen and very tender. And because you have lymph nodes all over your body, it can be very uncomfortable. After treatment the size of the lymph nodes decreases quite rapidly so even after a week or two, the dogs are feeling much better," said Terry Opgenorth, vice president of CSU Ventures.

Veterinarians estimate that one in four dogs will develop cancer. Doses are given every three weeks with a total of five infusions. 

Lymphoma is among the most common forms of cancer in pets. It typically starts in the lymph nodes and other organs of the immune system. The new drug is designed to target and attack cancer cells implicated in lymphoma.

"Across the board, we saw some positive activity in up to 80 percent of all the lymphoma patients that were treated with this medication," said Dr. Doug Thamm, a veterinarian and cancer researcher who led clinical trials at CSU's Flint Animal Cancer Center.

A 9-year-old Golden Retriever from Denver named Dane had his health rebound after treatment. His owners thought their dog would have to be euthanized because he could no longer stand and wouldn't eat or drink much.

After five months, Dane received his final treatment and his owners said he is doing much better.

Tanovea was originally created to treat lymphoma in human patients but never went through the human clinical development stage. The clinical trials were done on pets.

"The FDA has a center for veterinary medicine. They are very much interested in innovators of bringing drugs to market that actually have supportive data in the population that they'll treat, which are the canine patients. Tanovia is the first of its kind to treat canine lymphoma," Opgenorth said. 

(© 2017 KUSA)

 

Original article and copyrights located at: http://www.khou.com/news/local/animals/new-medication-a-breakthrough-for-canine-cancer/382569537

Pets need dietary supplements just like we do!

Pets need dietary supplements just like we do!

10 Halloween Safety Tips for Pets!

10 Halloween Safety Tips for Pets!

No Scaredy-Cats Allowed

 

Halloween can be a festive and fun time for children and families. But for pets? Let's face it, it can be a downright nightmare. Forgo the stress and dangers this year by following these 10 easy tips.

 

  1. Trick-or-treat candies are NOT for pets.

All forms of chocolate -- especially baking or dark chocolate -- can be dangerous, even lethal, for dogs and cats. Symptoms of chocolate poisoning may include vomiting, diarrhea, rapid breathing, increased heart rate, and seizures. Halloween candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also be poisonous to dogs. Even small amounts of xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar and subsequent loss of coordination and seizures. And while xylitol toxicity in cats has yet to be established, it's better to be safe than sorry.

 

  1. Don't leave pets out in the yard on Halloween.

Surprisingly, vicious pranksters have been known to tease, injure, steal, and even kill pets on Halloween night. Inexcusable? Yes! But preventable nonetheless.

 

  1. Keep pets confined and away from the door.

Not only will your door be constantly opening and closing on Halloween, but strangers will be dressed in unusual costumes and yelling loudly for their candy. This, of course, is scary for our furry friends. Dogs are especially territorial and may become anxious and growl at innocent trick-or-treaters. Putting your dog or cat in a secure room away from the front door will also prevent them from darting outside into the night … a night when no one wants to be searching for a lost loved one.

 

  1. Keep your outdoor cats inside several days before and several days after Halloween.

Black cats are especially at risk from pranks or other cruelty-related incidents. In fact, many shelters do not adopt out black cats during the month of October as a safety precaution.

 

  1. Keep Halloween plants such as pumpkins and corn out of reach.

Although they are relatively nontoxic, such plants can induce gastrointestinal upset should your pets ingest them in large quantities. Intestinal blockage can even occur if large pieces are swallowed. And speaking of pumpkins …

 

  1. Don't keep lit pumpkins around pets.

Should they get too close, they run the risk of burning themselves or knocking it over and causing a fire.

 

  1. Keep wires and electric light cords out of reach.

If chewed, your pet could cut himself or herself on shards of glass or plastic, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

 

  1. Don't dress your pet in a costume unless you know they'll love it.

If you do decide that Fido or Kitty needs a costume, make sure it isn't annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict movement, hearing, or the ability to breathe or bark and meow.

 

  1. Try on pet costumes before the big night.

If they seem distressed, allergic, or show abnormal behavior, consider letting them go in their “birthday suit”. Festive bandanas usually work for party poopers, too.

 

  1. IDs, please!

If your dog or cat should escape and become lost, having the proper identification will increase the chances that they will be returned. Just make sure the information is up-to-date, even if your pet does have one of those fancy-schmancy embedded microchips.

 

Source: PetMD

Dr Kruger Pet Supplements - Directions for Use

Dr Kruger Pet Supplements - Directions for Use

Our 3 Golden Rules that lead to success using any of the Dr Kruger Pet Supplements Formulas.

  1. The formulas are dosed based on the amount of food your pet eats per meal; this is the only true way to determine the proper amount of supplement/s your pet should be getting. Your goal is to get your dog up to 1 full scoop per one cup of food and your cat up to the equivalent amount of supplement/s based on the amount of food being fed.
  2. This will not work if you are trying to give supplements to more than one pet in a "free feeding" environment. This is based on predictive feeding as explained above.
  3. You must following our dosage instructions; your pet must have the supplement/s on every meal; skipping days or only giving the supplement/s on one meal a day (unless your pet only gets one meal a day) will not be sufficient for the supplement/s to do their job properly.

 DIRECTIONS FOR USE - DOGS:

Introducing anything new into your dog or cats diet should be done slowly over a 7 to 10 day period. This will allow your dogs system to get use to the new addition and reduce the likelihood of causing issues. For dogs and cats with very sensitive systems, consider stretching the introduction period out a little longer than 7 to 10 days. You know your dog better than anyone else; you are in the best position to judge how slowly you so go.

For all breeds of dogs:

Instructions:

Start off with just a pinch; this should be just enough to cover the bottom of the scoop (you should not be able to see the plastic bottom). Over the next 7 to 10 days (based on 1 cup of food per feeding) you will gradually add more supplement to the scoop go from:

Day 1: Just a pinch on each meal

Day 2: 2 pinches on each meal

Day 3: 3 pinches on each meal and so on...

Until you reach the desired dosage of 1 full scoop (teaspoon) per 1 cup of food.

Remember this has to go on each meal to achieve the desired results. For best results you should provide the supplement with each feeding.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR USE - CATS:

Introducing anything new into your cats diet should be done slowly over a 7 to 10 day period. This will allow your cats system to get use to the new addition and reduce the likelihood of causing issues. For cats with very sensitive systems, consider stretching the introduction period out a little longer than 7 to 10 days. You know your cat better than anyone else; you are in the best position to judge how slowly you so go.

For all breeds of cats:

Instructions:

Start off with just a pinch; this should be just enough to cover the bottom of the scoop (you should not be able to see the plastic bottom). Over the next 7 to 10 days (based on 1 cup of food per feeding) you will gradually add more supplement to the scoop go from:

Day 1: Just a pinch on each meal

Day 2: 2 pinches on each meal

Day 3: 3 pinches on each meal and so on...

Note: It is doubtful that your cat will eat more than 1/2 cup per feeding; you will most likely never reach one full scoop per one cup of food.  That is ok because it is based on the cat's food intake. Just make sure your cat is getting the proper dosage for the amount of food he or she is eating per meal.

TIP:  Most cats like a little gravy with their food; you can always add just enough warm water to melt the powder, mix good into the food so it coats all of the food in the bowl.

If your cat eats more than one cup of food or less than one cup of food per feeding you should adjust the increments accordingly.

 

 

Dr Kruger Puppy & Pregnancy Dog Formula

 

 

*** NOTE ***

"This formula is to be used on pregnant females at conception through the last puppy that is weaned. The female needs to stop getting this formula and should transition to the appropriate formula for her age, condition and needs. The puppies can continue to receive this formula until they are 6 months of age. Once the puppies are 6 months old they need to be transitioned to one of the other formulas based on their needs. At a minimum the puppies should transition to Everyday Health Formula."

One scoop per cup of food. Use with each feeding. Liver loosens the stool until the dogs adapt. To avoid diarrhea, start with just a pinch; this should be just enough to cover the bottom of the scoop (you should not be able to see the plastic bottom). Over the next 7 to 15 days (based on 1 cup of food per feeding) you will gradually add more supplement to the scoop go from:

Day 1: Just a pinch on each meal

Day 2: 2 pinches on each meal

Day 3: 3 pinches on each meal and so on...

Until you reach the desired dosage of 1 full scoop (teaspoon) per 1 cup of food.

Remember this has to go on each meal to achieve the desired results.

Note:  You should always monitor your female while she is nursing her litter. Note the amount of milk she is producing. Should she start to produce an over abundance of milk you should reduce the amount of Puppy & Pregnancy Formula she is getting on each meal until the milk she is producing is proportional to the amount of milk needed by the nursing litter.



Puppy & Pregnancy Formula is for all breeds of puppies between
weaned and 6 months old:

 

Using the scoop provided, sprinkle one level scoop over each cup of food. Use with each feeding. Incorporate with your dog's regular feedings to help give your dog the complete nutrition they were intended to have. Daily use will help produce strong newborn puppies that have both hearty appetites and strengthened immune systems.

 

Container       Servings

   Size

_____________________

  5 oz       =    40 Servings

10 oz       =    80 Servings

20 oz       =  160 Servings

54.75 oz  =  438 Servings

 

 

Have a picky eater on your hands?  Having trouble getting them to eat their formula?

Some of our customers have found easy ways to ensure that their beloved dog or cat gets their formula everyday mealtime by doing the following

 

  1. Put their formula in a small portion of cottage cheese, mix well and give it as an after meal treat.
  2. Put their formula in a small portion of yogurt, mix well and give it as an after meal treat.
  3. Mixing the formula with a small portion of peanut butter and given as an after meal treat has also been known to achieve the desired results.
  4. Dr Kruger Pet Supplements also makes a Flavor Enhanced version of our formulas that also solves the picky eater problem. For more information about or Flavor Enhanced Formulas please call our Toll Free number 1-800-711-8736 and we will be happy to help you!

You know your pet better than anyone else... trust your instincts and you will find a delivery method that works best for your particular pet!

Study demonstrates rapid decline in male dog fertility, with potential link to environmental contaminants

Study demonstrates rapid decline in male dog fertility, with potential link to environmental contaminants

Article Reprint:

 

Date: August 9, 2016

 

Source: University of Nottingham

 

Summary: The fertility of dogs may have suffered a sharp decline over the past three decades, a new study has found. The research found that sperm quality in a population of stud dogs studied over a 26-year period had fallen significantly.

 

A study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has discovered that the fertility of dogs may have suffered a sharp decline over the past three decades.

 

The research, published in the academic journal Scientific Reports, found that sperm quality in a population of stud dogs studied over a 26-year period had fallen significantly.

 

The work has highlighted a potential link to environmental contaminants, after they were able to demonstrate that chemicals found in the sperm and testes of adult dogs -- and in some commercially available pet foods -- had a detrimental effect on sperm function at the concentrations detected.

 

As 'man's best friend' and closest companion animal, the researchers believe that the latest results may offer a new piece of the puzzle over the reported significant decline in human semen quality -- a controversial subject which scientists continue to debate.

 

Dr Richard Lea, Reader in Reproductive Biology in the University's School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, who led the research said: "This is the first time that such a decline in male fertility has been reported in the dog and we believe this is due to environmental contaminants, some of which we have detected in dog food and in the sperm and testes of the animals themselves.

 

"While further research is needed to conclusively demonstrate a link, the dog may indeed be a sentinel for humans -- it shares the same environment, exhibits the same range of diseases, many with the same frequency and responds in a similar way to therapies."

 

The study centred on samples taken from stud dogs at an assistance dogs breeding centre over the course of 26 years. Professor Gary England, Foundation Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science and Professor of Comparative Veterinary Reproduction, who oversaw the collection of semen said: "The strength of the study is that all samples were processed and analysed by the same laboratory using the same protocols during that time and consequently the data generated is robust."

 

The work centred on five specific breeds of dogs -- Labrador retriever, golden retriever, curly coat retriever, border collie and German shepherd -- with between 42 and 97 dogs studied every year.

 

Semen was collected from the dogs and analysed to assess the percentage of sperm that showed a normal forward progressive pattern of motility and that appeared normal under a microscope (morphology).

 

Over the 26 years of the study, they found a striking decrease in the percentage of normal motile sperm. Between 1988 and 1998, sperm motility declined by 2.5 per cent per year and following a short period when stud dogs of compromised fertility were retired from the study, sperm motility from 2002 to 2014 continued to decline at a rate of 1.2% per year.

 

In addition, the team discovered that the male pups generated from the stud dogs with declining semen quality, had an increased incidence of cryptorchidism, a condition in which the testes of pups fail to correctly descend into the scrotum.

 

Sperm collected from the same breeding population of dogs, and testes recovered from dogs undergoing routine castration, were found to contain environmental contaminants at concentrations able to disrupt sperm motility and viability when tested.

 

The same chemicals that disrupted sperm quality, were also discovered in a range of commercially available dog foods -- including brands specifically marketed for puppies.

 

Dr Lea added: "We looked at other factors which may also play a part, for example, some genetic conditions do have an impact on fertility. However, we discounted that because 26 years is simply too rapid a decline to be associated with a genetic problem."

 

Over the past 70 years, studies have suggested a significant decline in human semen quality and a cluster of issues called 'testicular dysgenesis syndrome' that impact on male fertility which also include increased incidence of testicular cancer, the birth defect hypospadias and undescended testes.

 

However, declining human semen quality remains a controversial issue -- many have criticised the variability of the data of the studies on the basis of changes in laboratory methods, training of laboratory personnel and improved quality control over the years.

 

Dr Lea added: "The Nottingham study presents a unique set of reliable data from a controlled population which is free from these factors. This raises the tantalising prospect that the decline in canine semen quality has an environmental cause and begs the question whether a similar effect could also be observed in human male fertility."

 

Story Source:

 

Materials provided by University of Nottingham. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

 

Richard G. Lea, Andrew S. Byers, Rebecca N. Sumner, Stewart M. Rhind, Zulin Zhang, Sarah L. Freeman, Rachel Moxon, Holly M. Richardson, Martin Green, Jim Craigon, Gary C. W. England. Environmental chemicals impact dog semen quality in vitro and may be associated with a temporal decline in sperm motility and increased cryptorchidism. Scientific Reports, 2016; 6: 31281 DOI: 10.1038/srep31281

 

University of Nottingham. "Study demonstrates rapid decline in male dog fertility, with potential link to environmental contaminants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 August 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160809095138.htm>.

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